A FEW DOGS ON THE LOOSE

 

 

Epigraph

 

Hot eager air.

We’ll never be sad boys on the rampage.

Cracker-barrel humour!

Eyes and liquor raised in salute,

“Cool arms of flowers and a lap of rose.”

Their scars charm.

No rain just a bark and scurry

No clouds but a tsss with

Wet fingers through my hair.

We are heavy orange inlayed with asphalt.

Untitled 140

 

 

We don’t touch in unison

Limited to a few paces. Places.

“Roll on up! Roll on up!”

A Blockade of

Molten iron warns an approach

And I’m dancing on the ceiling.

 

“Roll on up my son! Roll on up!”

The tulips are hidden here

The sea and the intimacy wet my cuffs.

Secrets came here to dance.

I’m sure when these women die

They go to Paris.

 

The heat that we put into our brain by

Obsessing and thinking about

One thing we know.

Somebody turn on the lights.

It’s a pirate’s life…

“Roll up! Roll on up!”

 

A triumphant howl fills the empty theatre,

One man sits in the front row

A little to the left.

Flags, plaques, statues and so on.

World War II pin-up girls’

Legs whirl as bulging biceps curl

 

Love will never be lost.

Nonchalant words are cut out of and escape rusty corrugated iron. In opposition, gold enamel proudly delivers a line from a 1969 James Bond film trailer. A poem on the wall, ‘Untitled 140’, inspired by Lionel Richie lyrics, Oscar Wilde and Naval stories, alternates between setting the scene for the metal props and becoming the scene itself.

The words presented are not as essential as the dialogue between the language systems explored: structuralism and post-structuralism; as well as the themes of identity, fidelity and travel.

 

 

 

A FEW DOGS ON THE LOOSE

THE PLINTH

GLASGOW

03/08/15